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red rose with droplets early morning

By Jas2
another beautiful rose early morning in my garden

Tags: Close-up and macro Red roses

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Comments


banehawi Plus
15 2.1k 4012 Canada
8 Jul 2019 2:39PM
A single flower specimen lie this often looks best either as a vertical, portrait format shot, or cropped square as in the mod.

Its not a bad shot, and can be better.

One thing you asked on the last shot was how we know a subject is underexposed, and I suspect you would be interested also in how I would think this can be better.

The exposure, or the brightness is judged by that graph we call a histogram, which you can see on the cameras LCD screen when you review a shot, making sure the display on the 6d is set to histogram mode, and the histogram itself is set to R,G,B (I think this is one of the control settings,) the display is simply a matter of pressing the display button to step through the modes while viewing.


When I look closely at this, I notice that it lacks a lot of really good, crisp detail that the combination of camera and lens is capable of.

Looking at the shot settings, I notice that your shutter speed is quite slow; that lens IS is quite capable of shooting at this speed and handling camera shake (thats what IS is meant to do), however, it cannot cope with even the slightest subject movement. So think about this, - IS is for camera shake, not for subject movement, and you are on the way to better outdoor flower images.

When theres an chance of subject movement, which is most of the time outdoors, then you need a faster shutter speed. Also, as the macro lens will tend to be close to the subject, the need for speed is even greater. Experiment with this, go back to the roses and try Tv, shutter priority, and set it at 1/250th, and then faster, and faster, while ISO is set to AUTO and see the difference this makes.


I did upload a mod that has some sharpening, less red saturation, and is cropped.


Also, below is a link to a youtube video on reading a histogramme.






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dudler Plus
15 877 1496 England
8 Jul 2019 5:24PM
I'm with Willie in his detailed comments on this.

I'll just note that the EXIF shows that you shot this the same day as your last post, and so you obviously didn't have the chance to apply anything that was suggested to taking this picture.

If you want to develop your technique, the best thing is to go back out and shoot more pictures, taking note of the suggestions you've had, and posting with specific feedback for us on how you think each element went. A conversation is always good, and feedback encourages us!
8 Jul 2019 8:32PM
With today's technology anyone can point a camera at something and press a button... it's not rocket science. Most of the time it will turn out okay, with minimum effort.
But is that enough? Look at this and ask yourself what it was about the rose that made you want to photograph it in the first place. For me it would be the shapes of the furling petals, so I would want to work on the image to bring that to the fore, excluding anything that was contrary to that vision. That way, I might end up with something that someone might even want to put on a wall and look at. In other words I would try to turn something that was basically just a simple record into an actual picture.
I'll upload a mod, purely as illustration.

That's a personal view, does any of it make sense?

Alan
paulbroad Plus
11 127 1282 United Kingdom
8 Jul 2019 8:42PM
Whilst I see the point in the above comments, this looks pretty good to me in general and is actually quite sharp, although te shutter speed is dangerously slow. I would crop the left to move the bloom to the left, but I don't mind the landscape format.

Red is a difficult colour to record digitally and you have done well here.


paul
pamelajean Plus
13 1.2k 2082 United Kingdom
8 Jul 2019 8:44PM
Your other flowers have been close-ups of their centres, so here we have an alternative presentation, the whole flower. You have successfully carried out the first important compositional requirement, and that is to have all of the petals inside your frame, with space all around. Also, your background has no distractions and is very nicely blurred.

The next thing to do is decide how you want the flower to sit in your frame. Willie has offset the rose to the left. With a straightforward take like this, you might choose to simply have the same amount of space showing all around.

To make your presentation a bit more impactful, try turning your camera so that the flower sits on a diagonal, perhaps with the stem emanating from one of the bottom corners, if possible. Showing some stem and even a few leaves will also add a bit more interest. You have cleverly caught some water droplets on the rose, which is in itself of interest, and adds an attractive freshness. Some flower photographers even use a water spray if nature doesn't provide the necessary dropsSmile. Sometimes there might be an interesting insect on your chosen bloom, which will definitely add impact.

Red and yellow flowers are notoriously difficult to capture well, and are often overly saturated. I have found that reducing exposure compensation for these colours helps. Also, check what colour setting you have on your camera.

Try to choose a bloom that is at its best, not chewed or damaged, not going brown or getting too old. Having said that, there can sometimes be beauty in a flower that's past its prime. The bottom front petal on your rose is showing signs of age.

Your exif shows that this was taken at 9.15pm, but you title it as "early morning". Maybe your camera's clock needs correcting? Early morning is a good time to photograph flowers because the sun isn't too strong and you get soft light. Avoid mid-day whenever possible. Overcast and hazy days when it's a little cloudy are perfect, as the clouds act as a giant softbox, diffusing the light.

Pamela.
Jas2 2
9 Jul 2019 1:10AM

Quote:I'm with Willie in his detailed comments on this.

I'll just note that the EXIF shows that you shot this the same day as your last post, and so you obviously didn't have the chance to apply anything that was suggested to taking this picture.

If you want to develop your technique, the best thing is to go back out and shoot more pictures, taking note of the suggestions you've had, and posting with specific feedback for us on how you think each element went. A conversation is always good, and feedback encourages us!



Many thanks for your advice. I am trying to get better. Please advice on the sunflower picture I have posted today. I have tried to follow compositional advice given by all of you with regards rule of thirds, portrait ( vertical frame ) and brightened the picture a bit as well.
Jas2 2
9 Jul 2019 1:14AM

Quote:With today's technology anyone can point a camera at something and press a button... it's not rocket science. Most of the time it will turn out okay, with minimum effort.
But is that enough? Look at this and ask yourself what it was about the rose that made you want to photograph it in the first place. For me it would be the shapes of the furling petals, so I would want to work on the image to bring that to the fore, excluding anything that was contrary to that vision. That way, I might end up with something that someone might even want to put on a wall and look at. In other words I would try to turn something that was basically just a simple record into an actual picture.
I'll upload a mod, purely as illustration.

That's a personal view, does any of it make sense?

Many thanks Alan. Its a beautiful mod that you have uploaded . Indeed it looks amazing and quite truly its the pattern on this new rosebud that I wanted to capture . Its interesting but I note that flowers can be used to fill the frame as well as in some instances have some space included around them, both seem to have a different impact but your mod is certainly worth hanging on a wall.

Alan

Jas2 2
9 Jul 2019 1:18AM

Quote:A single flower specimen lie this often looks best either as a vertical, portrait format shot, or cropped square as in the mod.

Its not a bad shot, and can be better.

One thing you asked on the last shot was how we know a subject is underexposed, and I suspect you would be interested also in how I would think this can be better.

The exposure, or the brightness is judged by that graph we call a histogram, which you can see on the cameras LCD screen when you review a shot, making sure the display on the 6d is set to histogram mode, and the histogram itself is set to R,G,B (I think this is one of the control settings,) the display is simply a matter of pressing the display button to step through the modes while viewing.


When I look closely at this, I notice that it lacks a lot of really good, crisp detail that the combination of camera and lens is capable of.

Looking at the shot settings, I notice that your shutter speed is quite slow; that lens IS is quite capable of shooting at this speed and handling camera shake (thats what IS is meant to do), however, it cannot cope with even the slightest subject movement. So think about this, - IS is for camera shake, not for subject movement, and you are on the way to better outdoor flower images.

When theres an chance of subject movement, which is most of the time outdoors, then you need a faster shutter speed. Also, as the macro lens will tend to be close to the subject, the need for speed is even greater. Experiment with this, go back to the roses and try Tv, shutter priority, and set it at 1/250th, and then faster, and faster, while ISO is set to AUTO and see the difference this makes.


I did upload a mod that has some sharpening, less red saturation, and is cropped.


Also, below is a link to a youtube video on reading a histogramme.









Hi , Many thanks for your advice. Please have a look at a portrait of a sunflower that I have added today following your advice . I have also brightened it a bit by making use of the histogram as suggested.Also this time around it has a higher shutter speed to reduce blurring due to movement.
Jas2 2
9 Jul 2019 1:22AM

Quote:Whilst I see the point in the above comments, this looks pretty good to me in general and is actually quite sharp, although te shutter speed is dangerously slow. I would crop the left to move the bloom to the left, but I don't mind the landscape format.

Red is a difficult colour to record digitally and you have done well here.


paul



Many thanks Paul for your words of encouragement. My pictures though still lack that WOW factor. How can I improvise so that my pictures add more impact?
Please also appraise the sunflower that I have shot in vertical format to include its magnificent leaves..I think they add a story to the magnificence of a giant sunflower....
mrswoolybill Plus
12 1.5k 2060 United Kingdom
10 Jul 2019 9:07AM

Quote:My pictures though still lack that WOW factor. How can I improvise so that my pictures add more impact?

I'm late on the scene here but it's an interesting question. Two entirely separate thoughts...

The WOW factor may be over-valued. Subtlety also matters. I think it's important to get people to look further, I like images that draw me in rather than blow me away.

Secondly, my advice would be to check out the light first, what it is doing from different angles. Then look through the camera, look at what the camera is seeing. Try going in close, try different angles, move around. Remember that you are seeing something in the round, in three dimensions, but the final image is flat, presented in two dimensions. What matters is the arrangement of lines and shapes within a rectangular frame. It's called composition.

If you are interested there is a wonderful book that I recommend regularly - The Photographer's Eye by Michael Freeman. Among other things, it discusses how the human eye and brain respond to images, explore them, how composition can involve the viewer.
Moira

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