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Reflection

By JuanCarlos
White Heron (great egret) in Nature Reserve in the Pacific Ocean of Guatemala. (Monterrico)

Tags: Birds Travel Guatemala Wildlife and nature

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Comments


banehawi Plus
17 2.7k 4282 Canada
16 Jun 2016 5:47PM
It looks like a combination of challenges here prevented this from being a great shot.

The Heron is extremely bright compared to all of the environment its it, so a very wide dynamic range; the camera seems to have focused on the log in the water just in front of the Heron, - it will have difficulty focusing on the Heron due to lack of, or absence of contrast, needing Manual focus; the light and time of day, humidity, etc may have been misty, softening the entire shot.

The end result is that the main focal point, the Heron and the nice reflection, are very soft.


Regards


Willie
dudler Plus
18 1.8k 1892 England
16 Jun 2016 9:06PM
Thsi is a 'nearly' shot: if the heron was sharp, it would, for me, be 'there' - though if I could I'd simplify things. In my mod, I've darkened a little, and cloned out the interruption in the bakcground, and one of the stems in the foreground.

A fraction less exposure to retain good tones in the heron would be good. Manual exposure is only a virtue if you get the right results...
dark_lord Plus
17 2.9k 793 England
16 Jun 2016 9:56PM
Yes, this is so 'nearly there'.

Given your shutter speed and focal length this should be sharp, so it all comes down to focus technique. By placing the focus point over the edge of the bird the camera should be able to focus no problem. Then recompose. You may need to tweak the focus manually after recomposing, and that's something I do now and again when using long lenses.

Herons and egrets tend to stand quite still so there's plenty of opportunity to focus and frame up.

Some cloning to tidy up distractions as John has done can be regarded as icing on the cake. It's frowned upon (indeed not allowed for natural history record and competition) to do substantial tidying up.alteration of natural history subjects, but purely for a pictorial result you can d that. How much depends on how comfortable you feel and your software skills.

But you've framed it well and got some nice light, which can often be the hardest part.
16 Jun 2016 11:01PM

Quote:It looks like a combination of challenges here prevented this from being a great shot.

The Heron is extremely bright compared to all of the environment its it, so a very wide dynamic range; the camera seems to have focused on the log in the water just in front of the Heron, - it will have difficulty focusing on the Heron due to lack of, or absence of contrast, needing Manual focus; the light and time of day, humidity, etc may have been misty, softening the entire shot.

The end result is that the main focal point, the Heron and the nice reflection, are very soft.


Regards


Willie



Willie: It seems you were in the river the day I took the picture! I have to work very hard with the focus on bird photographs . Thank you very much for your comments and teachings.
16 Jun 2016 11:03PM

Quote:Thsi is a 'nearly' shot: if the heron was sharp, it would, for me, be 'there' - though if I could I'd simplify things. In my mod, I've darkened a little, and cloned out the interruption in the bakcground, and one of the stems in the foreground.

A fraction less exposure to retain good tones in the heron would be good. Manual exposure is only a virtue if you get the right results...



Thank you dudler.
16 Jun 2016 11:08PM

Quote:Yes, this is so 'nearly there'.

Given your shutter speed and focal length this should be sharp, so it all comes down to focus technique. By placing the focus point over the edge of the bird the camera should be able to focus no problem. Then recompose. You may need to tweak the focus manually after recomposing, and that's something I do now and again when using long lenses.

Herons and egrets tend to stand quite still so there's plenty of opportunity to focus and frame up.

Some cloning to tidy up distractions as John has done can be regarded as icing on the cake. It's frowned

upon (indeed not allowed for natural history record and competition) to do substantial tidying up.alteration of natural history subjects, but purely for a pictorial result you can d that. How much depends on how comfortable you feel and your software skills.

But you've framed it well and got some nice light, which can often be the hardest part.



Darlord: Thanks for your tips. I have much interest in photography bird and keep practicing . Greetings.

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