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Simon Wakely

By karlevans591
This picture was taken at the enduro sprint in Dorset.Catching the rider in mid air.

Tags: Motor bikes Sports and action

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This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.

Comments


paulbroad 8 114 1033 United Kingdom
20 Jun 2012 5:17PM
Did you intend the white border round the rider - I must assume you did. This makes the image un-natural but actually, very effective indeed. It has thus to be seen as an effect shot rather than actual record. Just a tiny bit of space needed under the read wheel.


I like it.

Paul

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Davesumner 9 28 300 Australia
21 Jun 2012 4:47AM
Hi Karl,

I'm not sure how much critique you are after and I don't mean to be harsh but the glow around the rider does nothing for me at all, sorry. Had the rider been brighter as he is but without the halo effect it would have worked for me better I think. Putting the halo aside the shot is too sharp and doesn't show movement, for me the wheels need to have movement in them to show that the rider hasn't been cut and pasted into the background. I always like to get some of the surroundings into my shot to give context to the situation. Also the rider is too central in the image and doesn't have space to move into.

When I shoot motocross bikes and riders, I try to pick a vantage point that has a suitable background that gives scale and context to my shots. This may involve gaining track access with the organisers but usually if you ask you can get. I use a panning technique with slower shutter speed so that I capture the rider and bike but the background and wheel centre's are blurred to show that the bike is actually moving. This is a technique that requires practice but I honed my skills by sitting on a busy bridge that a lot of cyclists used and took shot after shot until I could correctly capture what I wanted to achieve. Eventually you can just about guess what settings you will need. It isn't any use putting the camera onto the 'Sports' mode because this just tends to try and get as fast a shutter speed as possible which loses the blurred wheels etc. so you will need to use at least Tv (Canon) or T (Nikon) mode and take some control over the shots to get the effects with the wheels.

I hope this helps

DaVeS

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