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This is a photo of a pomegranate that was taken in the afternoon and has been changed with color, size and brightness by the software

By nkargar1356
This is a photo of a pomegranate that was taken in the afternoon and has been changed with color, size and brightness by the software

Tags: Nature Fruit Flowers and plants

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Comments


dudler Plus
18 1.7k 1877 England
20 Jul 2021 11:04AM
The image is fine, nicely lit and framed, but it's unsharp. That's almost certainly because the shutter speed allowed either camera shake, or subject movement, or both.

Was the camera on a tripod? If not, try it for the next image like this.
mrswoolybill Plus
14 2.9k 2457 United Kingdom
20 Jul 2021 11:39AM
As John says, it's very soft, and this looks like camera shake! I am assuming hand-held.

I will sometimes risk 1/15 second hand-held if using very wide angle (ie short focal length) and if I have something to brace myself against. Not otherwise! Here you were towards the longer end of your zoom. Remember that as you extend the lens, the centre of gravity moves away from your hands, stability becomes harder, camera shake becomes an increasing problem.

You need a shutter speed fast enough to cope with any wobble. The standard advice has always been - shutter speed no slower than the reciprocal of the full frame equivalent focal length. Your camera has a 1.6 crop factor so the full frame equivalent with this lens is 29-88mm. So aim to keep within a sliding scale of 1/30 to 1/100 second, ie the nearest appropriate speeds that the camera gives. Does that make sense?

Further points - always use the viewfinder when hand-holding, don't hold the camera out in front of you and compose on the screen, that massively increases the wobble risk. Hold the camera firmly against the face, tuck your elbows in, stand with feet slightly apart or find a wall or firm tree trunk to lean against. Then think about where you are going to focus.

Get the basic image right before thinking about processing. Now go and try this again, because it is a very pleasing subject!
Regards,
Moira
banehawi Plus
17 2.5k 4263 Canada
20 Jul 2021 3:55PM
Ive never seen Pomegranates growing before, this is new to me. The exposure looks quite good, as does the colour.

As already mentioned above, shutter speed is too slow, so tiny natural movement of hands is seen in the image,

Moira shows how a minimum shutter speed can be calculated, with the range for you zoom lens being 1/30 to 1/100 to be safe. So, the shorter the focal length, that is the closer you get to 18mm, the slower the shutter you can use, and its the opposite as you go towards 55mm.

Then you may ask what about IS, image stabilization? That SHOULD provide 2 or 3 stops if stabilization, allowing you to shoot slower than these recommended values. Lets take a look at the focal length you used, 48mm. The slowest recommended shutter speed for this without IS and a steady hand is 1/80th. A one stop advantage from IS allows 1/40, and a 2 stop advantage can use 1/20th. So its marginal at 1/15th.

However, one important aspect to consider is the distance from the camera to the subject; the closer it is, the faster the shutter speed needs to be, so those ideal minimum speeds wont even work when very close, they need to be even faster.
In addition, if you have cropped this closer to make the image larger, you will effectively amplify any shake so its more visible.

In this case, using ISO 800, or f/5.6 would have allowed a shutter of 1/30 and possibly a successful shot!

I have uploaded a modification that tries to show the image with no shake..


I hope you find this useful.


Regards


Willie
20 Jul 2021 8:11PM

Quote:Ive never seen Pomegranates growing before, this is new to me. The exposure looks quite good, as does the colour.

As already mentioned above, shutter speed is too slow, so tiny natural movement of hands is seen in the image,

Moira shows how a minimum shutter speed can be calculated, with the range for you zoom lens being 1/30 to 1/100 to be safe. So, the shorter the focal length, that is the closer you get to 18mm, the slower the shutter you can use, and its the opposite as you go towards 55mm.

Then you may ask what about IS, image stabilization? That SHOULD provide 2 or 3 stops if stabilization, allowing you to shoot slower than these recommended values. Lets take a look at the focal length you used, 48mm. The slowest recommended shutter speed for this without IS and a steady hand is 1/80th. A one stop advantage from IS allows 1/40, and a 2 stop advantage can use 1/20th. So its marginal at 1/15th.

However, one important aspect to consider is the distance from the camera to the subject; the closer it is, the faster the shutter speed needs to be, so those ideal minimum speeds wont even work when very close, they need to be even faster.
In addition, if you have cropped this closer to make the image larger, you will effectively amplify any shake so its more visible.

In this case, using ISO 800, or f/5.6 would have allowed a shutter of 1/30 and possibly a successful shot!

I have uploaded a modification that tries to show the image with no shake..


I hope you find this useful.


Regards


Willie


thank you
20 Jul 2021 8:11PM

Quote:As John says, it's very soft, and this looks like camera shake! I am assuming hand-held.

I will sometimes risk 1/15 second hand-held if using very wide angle (ie short focal length) and if I have something to brace myself against. Not otherwise! Here you were towards the longer end of your zoom. Remember that as you extend the lens, the centre of gravity moves away from your hands, stability becomes harder, camera shake becomes an increasing problem.

You need a shutter speed fast enough to cope with any wobble. The standard advice has always been - shutter speed no slower than the reciprocal of the full frame equivalent focal length. Your camera has a 1.6 crop factor so the full frame equivalent with this lens is 29-88mm. So aim to keep within a sliding scale of 1/30 to 1/100 second, ie the nearest appropriate speeds that the camera gives. Does that make sense?

Further points - always use the viewfinder when hand-holding, don't hold the camera out in front of you and compose on the screen, that massively increases the wobble risk. Hold the camera firmly against the face, tuck your elbows in, stand with feet slightly apart or find a wall or firm tree trunk to lean against. Then think about where you are going to focus.

Get the basic image right before thinking about processing. Now go and try this again, because it is a very pleasing subject!
Regards,
Moira


thank you
20 Jul 2021 8:12PM

Quote:The image is fine, nicely lit and framed, but it's unsharp. That's almost certainly because the shutter speed allowed either camera shake, or subject movement, or both.

Was the camera on a tripod? If not, try it for the next image like this.


thank you
pamelajean Plus
15 1.6k 2238 United Kingdom
21 Jul 2021 12:16PM
Hello again, Naser.

The pomegranates are well lit, nice and shiny and with 3 in the group. The frame is full of fruit and glossy leaves, with no other distractions. All very good points.

The lack of focus has been mentioned.

Your fruits are a little tight in the frame, with the tips of two of them touching the frame edges. If you had turned your camera clockwise a little, there would have been some space between the tips and the frame edges. Alternatively, if this is a crop, you can easily crop less tightly.

Pamela.
22 Jul 2021 5:32PM

Quote:Hello again, Naser.

The pomegranates are well lit, nice and shiny and with 3 in the group. The frame is full of fruit and glossy leaves, with no other distractions. All very good points.

The lack of focus has been mentioned.

Your fruits are a little tight in the frame, with the tips of two of them touching the frame edges. If you had turned your camera clockwise a little, there would have been some space between the tips and the frame edges. Alternatively, if this is a crop, you can easily crop less tightly.

Pamela.


thank you

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