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TRY AS I MIGHT....

By Tish1    
I can't tell you how often I have tried to photograph the moon without much in the way of success; this is the best I've done so far Blush Well, the first attempt was just a white blob.

Although these were taken hand held, all other attempts have been with a tripod and they weren't as good as these, I use the term 'good' loosely.

V1 was MF while V2 was AF and to my eye V1 has the edge, although not by much, apart from cropping, no processing has taken place.

.............. So, what is the secrete?????????????????????

Tish

Tags: Critique General The moon

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Comments


8 Oct 2014 11:51PM
I hand-held my camera as well; however, I used the wall of our house to hold it up against, so as to avoid all jiggling. Try that, you can also use a tree or any solid object. I also captured the red color.

Good luck!
Tish1 Plus
9 32 5 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2014 11:58PM

Quote:I hand-held my camera as well; however, I used the wall of our house to hold it up against, so as to avoid all jiggling. Try that, you can also use a tree or any solid object. I also captured the red color.

Good luck!



Thank you, America always seems to have a much bigger moon than we do, so can you send it over to the UK so that I have something bigger to focus on GrinGrinGrin


Tish
Sooty_1 12 1.5k 221 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2014 12:43AM
I'm not sure your exif is realistic...it says 1/100 at f/5.6 and ISO 100, with a +5 compensation. At that the moon would be a blown out white blob.

Remember that the sun is lighting the face of the moon, so a realistic exposure would be similar to one on earth during a sunny day. I'd suggest using manual mode, and starting around 1/125 or 1/250 at f/8, ISO 100 and forget the exposure compensation (which is meaningless in manual). Use your tripod, and either use a remote release, or the self timer, so you're not touching the camera at the point your shutter opens. This will help prevent shake. You can also lock your mirror up too. Better still, if hand holding, use a higher speed, upping the ISO if necessary to reduce the effect of shake. Rule of thumb is a shutter speed not lower than the reciprocal of the focal length, so for a 300 mm, you should have the shutter speed at least that, preferably 1/500 minimum. For critical work, and this shot will require some cropping, higher is better, especially as your camera will comfortably deal with high ISOs.

Using the lens in the middling apertures will give best performance, say between f/8 and f/11.

Focussing on the moon is essentially at infinity, however, most AF lenses focus past infinity, so if you manually just turn it all the way in the dark, you will go past the sharpest point of focus. You need to use a light to see when the infinity mark aligns. If using AF, focus on something like a light a long way away, then change to manual focus and don't move the control. I have had no problem with my AF finding the moon though, especially a fairly bright one.

Also, make sure you aren't shooting through a window, or there is something else for the AF to lock on to, which will cause focus to be in the wrong place.

So in summary, steady the camera as much as possible. Use similar exposure values to a sunny terrestrial day, remember it is daytime on the lit part of the moon! Ensure your focus is actually on the moon - you should be able to see that through the viewfinder. Try not to be touching the camera when the shutter trips. If you must hold it, set the ISO up to 800, 1200, 1600 to give you a high enough shutter speed.

Nick
Tish1 Plus
9 32 5 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2014 1:09AM

Quote:I'm not sure your exif is realistic...it says 1/100 at f/5.6 and ISO 100, with a +5 compensation. At that the moon would be a blown out white blob.

Remember that the sun is lighting the face of the moon, so a realistic exposure would be similar to one on earth during a sunny day. I'd suggest using manual mode, and starting around 1/125 or 1/250 at f/8, ISO 100 and forget the exposure compensation (which is meaningless in manual). Use your tripod, and either use a remote release, or the self timer, so you're not touching the camera at the point your shutter opens. This will help prevent shake. You can also lock your mirror up too. Better still, if hand holding, use a higher speed, upping the ISO if necessary to reduce the effect of shake. Rule of thumb is a shutter speed not lower than the reciprocal of the focal length, so for a 300 mm, you should have the shutter speed at least that, preferably 1/500 minimum. For critical work, and this shot will require some cropping, higher is better, especially as your camera will comfortably deal with high ISOs.

Using the lens in the middling apertures will give best performance, say between f/8 and f/11.

Focussing on the moon is essentially at infinity, however, most AF lenses focus past infinity, so if you manually just turn it all the way in the dark, you will go past the sharpest point of focus. You need to use a light to see when the infinity mark aligns. If using AF, focus on something like a light a long way away, then change to manual focus and don't move the control. I have had no problem with my AF finding the moon though, especially a fairly bright one.

Also, make sure you aren't shooting through a window, or there is something else for the AF to lock on to, which will cause focus to be in the wrong place.

So in summary, steady the camera as much as possible. Use similar exposure values to a sunny terrestrial day, remember it is daytime on the lit part of the moon! Ensure your focus is actually on the moon - you should be able to see that through the viewfinder. Try not to be touching the camera when the shutter trips. If you must hold it, set the ISO up to 800, 1200, 1600 to give you a high enough shutter speed.

Nick


Quote:I'm not sure your exif is realistic...it says 1/100 at f/5.6 and ISO 100, with a +5 compensation. At that the moon would be a blown out white blob.

Remember that the sun is lighting the face of the moon, so a realistic exposure would be similar to one on earth during a sunny day. I'd suggest using manual mode, and starting around 1/125 or 1/250 at f/8, ISO 100 and forget the exposure compensation (which is meaningless in manual). Use your tripod, and either use a remote release, or the self timer, so you're not touching the camera at the point your shutter opens. This will help prevent shake. You can also lock your mirror up too. Better still, if hand holding, use a higher speed, upping the ISO if necessary to reduce the effect of shake. Rule of thumb is a shutter speed not lower than the reciprocal of the focal length, so for a 300 mm, you should have the shutter speed at least that, preferably 1/500 minimum. For critical work, and this shot will require some cropping, higher is better, especially as your camera will comfortably deal with high ISOs.

Using the lens in the middling apertures will give best performance, say between f/8 and f/11.

Focussing on the moon is essentially at infinity, however, most AF lenses focus past infinity, so if you manually just turn it all the way in the dark, you will go past the sharpest point of focus. You need to use a light to see when the infinity mark aligns. If using AF, focus on something like a light a long way away, then change to manual focus and don't move the control. I have had no problem with my AF finding the moon though, especially a fairly bright one.

Also, make sure you aren't shooting through a window, or there is something else for the AF to lock on to, which will cause focus to be in the wrong place.

So in summary, steady the camera as much as possible. Use similar exposure values to a sunny terrestrial day, remember it is daytime on the lit part of the moon! Ensure your focus is actually on the moon - you should be able to see that through the viewfinder. Try not to be touching the camera when the shutter trips. If you must hold it, set the ISO up to 800, 1200, 1600 to give you a high enough shutter speed.

Nick



Wow Nick, thank you so much for this very comprehensive explanation. If we have a clear night this coming evening I will attempt to implement your advice.

Strangely enough my last upload had strange exit settings, I think I might need to look into that.

Tish
chensuriashi Plus
16 334 18 England
9 Oct 2014 1:44AM
I used 1/50 sec ISO 160 and 215mm with my SX50 on my last moon shot try that as a starting point, but the moon does move quite quickly and you did have the cam set on Auto try my manual settings as cameras do shoot better on manual setting,Wink Hope that helps, looking forward to seeing a good one soon from that super cam you have. Chen.
banehawi Plus
18 2.7k 4311 Canada
9 Oct 2014 1:47AM
Tripod is mandatory. Otherwise you get what you got. Thats camera shake at least, if not badly focused in addition.

Manual focus, though auto is fine as long as the focus point is on the Moon.

f/11 at 1/(ISO) and youre done.

So if ISO is 100, settings, Manual mode, are f/11, and 1/100; If ISO is 200, then f/11, and 1/200th.

At 300mm the Moon will be quite small. With that big sensor, you should be able to crop quite close.

A focal length of more than 500mm starts to give nice results. 1000mm is ideal.

You used Shutter priority, - use Manual; you adjusted by +5, and this wont be very successful, as the only setting the camera can use to respond to your +5 is aperture, and its wide open, so its likely +5 didnt do much, if anything.

Take a look at the other Moon shot in the Critique Gallery, and see what he did.



Regards



Willie
ddolfelin Plus
10 103 3 Wales
9 Oct 2014 7:52AM
It's all been said.
The moon is a moving subject and the camera has to be held still so not too long an exposure.
Good luck!
paulbroad Plus
14 131 1294 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2014 8:12AM
Lots of comment. Simply, you need a strong rigid tripod and the correct exposure. Without the first, the second has little relevance, you will get movement blur.

Paul
rayme330 10 17 1 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2014 8:45AM
I have the same problems myself Tish. I have never managed a decent shot of the moon yet. Sad

Ray
Mollycat Plus
8 21 2 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2014 8:51AM
The theory is good. Lets see what happens when you put it into practise Tish.
Peter.
Nikonuser1 Plus
9 172 16 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2014 8:57AM
Lots of great advice here Tish, The last time I captured the moon I used manual focus, tripod, cable release, F11, a fairly high ISO of 320, with a shutter speed of 1/200. Smile

Cliff
ColleenA Plus
9 502 8 Australia
9 Oct 2014 10:11AM
Suggest you look at Walters moon image(gajewski)... He has nailed moon photography...the answer is to stay up all night taking multiple images every 5 minutes..he does give a link to a tutorial...I will continue with my beauty sleep and leave this type of photography to the experts
capto Plus
10 7.0k 32 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2014 2:06PM
Great fun trying for you, if at first you don't succeed etc...Smile
I did a mod running the shake reduction filter in PS.

ivor
danbrann 17 640 17
9 Oct 2014 3:40PM
The secret may well be....If at first you don't succeed...pack it in.
TrevBatWCC Plus
14 13 19 England
9 Oct 2014 3:58PM
Well, I've never tried to photograph the moon (I have to confess that where I've added moon images to my shots, I've used a stock image!).
I would go along with what's been said above - viewing objects in the sky at large magnifications does show how fast they actually move! Also, I would manual focus rather than autofocus Smile
Trev Smile
gajewski 17 10 9 United States
9 Oct 2014 6:19PM
Tish,
I'm flattered by Colleen's kind words for my moon shot. However, I don't recommend staying up all night. I did that to capture various phases of the eclipse.

Your work is getting very close to what you would like to accomplish.
You have been given some good advice by several people on this page -- especially from Nick.

By the way, don't go by the efix settings you see on my moon shot. That required a longer exposure because the moon was in the earth's shadow at the time (and therefore much darker).

I would suggest that you go back to using a tripod. Your Nikon D800 with the lens that zooms to 300 mm is a great combination and it just takes some practice on your part.

Regarding focusing: I used autofocus with my focus point right on the image of the moon. However, after the camera focused, I turned autofocus off and left it in manual focus so that my camera wasn't trying to refocus when I triggered the shutter. I too would recommend not touching the camera to fire the shutter. You could just use the timer function set to 10 seconds so that the camera isn't vibrating while the shutter is open.

I got a good exposure of the full moon (before eclipse) with my lens at the most open f/stop. In your case, if you zoom your lens all the way out to 300 mm, you could use the f/5.6. with a shutter speed of 1/500th of a second (listed as 500 on the camera shutter speed choices).

Banehawi is correct. Don't use shutter priority or aperture priority. Use manual.

I hope this helps. Keep in touch.
-=\Walter
PS Thanks for your earlier note.
dudler Plus
18 1.9k 1937 England
9 Oct 2014 9:56PM
On exposure, the advice to remember it's a darkish rock in bright sunshine is sound. Treat it like Snowdon... Willie quotes the standard formula.

Focus - it's a good point that many lenses focus past infinity. Good manual focus ones don't, generally - but with AF glass, it's an extra variable, and just turning the ring all the way won't be right with a lot of lenses! So I'd either use AF, or look at the viewfinder image VERY carefully. Those with live view actually have an advantage here!

And a tripod, and a good one. It's boring, but it really is necessary for good results.
tonyng Plus
12 12 3 United Kingdom
10 Oct 2014 11:13AM
You have some great and useful comments here. One thing I will add is that you've used multi-segment metering. This means you are metering everything in the frame and not the moon itself. This will tend to blow the moon out. I'd suggest that you use spot metering (on the bright area of the moon itself).
Good luck.

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