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Waiting for no man

By blohum  
A recent shot with a 10-stopper, what are your thoughts on the high contrast processing choice and position of the rocks within the frame?

Tags: Wide angle Rocks Sunrise Black and white Long exposure Ultra wide Boulders Portwrinkle Olympus 9-18mm F4.0-5.6

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Comments


TanyaH Plus
16 1.3k 395 United Kingdom
3 Mar 2016 12:02PM
I've no issue with the high contrast processing choice, as I think it suits the subject matter beautifully. Dark, moody and atmospheric. If I was being really picky, I'd say you need a fraction more detail in the dark rocks on the left edge and bottom left corner, but again that's very much a subjective thing.

I like the placement of the two rocks on the horizon line - they're above it enough to not seem an accidental placement and that zig-zag through the foreground rocks nicely leads the eye out towards those two 'guardians' further out.

Some will love the cotton candy soft water, some will hate it (Paul Grin). I personally love it as it's ethereal and misty and for me adds a wonderfully timeless quality to an image. An overdone technique, quite possibly, but I've always been a sucker for this kind of water, rather than the pin-sharp, frozen-in-time type. This kind of milky water effect allows my imagination to drift and dream.

It's also not a 'pure' black and white, and seems to have a slight warmth to the tones which is something that ticks the boxes with me Smile

So yeah - good one!

Tanya

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blohum 3
3 Mar 2016 1:00PM
Thank you Tanya,

I know the smooth water effect is a bit "marmite" but I do like it too! Smile I will have to have a play with the details on the rocks on the left and see if I can pull anything more out of the shadows.

I was intrigued by your last comment... I haven't intentionally added any warmth to the scene, it was a straight B&W conversion in Lightroom... do you mean your seeing some slight colour tones in the image?

Tim




TanyaH Plus
16 1.3k 395 United Kingdom
3 Mar 2016 1:18PM
Yeah - on my screen, there's the slightest hint of warmth, like a deep, rich loamy brown warmth. Could just be my screen, of course, or my eyes - that's highly possible ...

But if you haven't added that intentially, then I don't know. If it looks 'straight' mono on your screen, then assume the warmth issue is at my end Grin

Tanya
banehawi Plus
15 2.2k 4052 Canada
3 Mar 2016 2:12PM
Nice idea, and well done overall.


Its soft overall, and needs some sharpening to improve detail in the rocks.

Its well underexposed, which is fine, but the absence of white means theres all blacks and mid-tones which may appear to have a tint as Tanya described; if white is white, this impression disappears,

It needs a minute rotation, and I would add a little space at the top to place the horizon on a third. The mod has blacks with more detail, slightly brighter, and sharpening.

I know the camera has built-in image stabilisation - does this need to be disabled with a long tripod exposure? Or doe the camera "know" its on a tripod?


Regards



Willie
blohum 3
3 Mar 2016 4:20PM
Thanks for the mod Willie,

I mentioned softness on the last image I posted for feedback, my uploaded image looks far softer on the site that the mods and also softer than it does when I open the file locally... I'd exported at 2000 pixels on the long edge as was mentioned previously and also applied sharpening for screen on export. Not sure if I'm missing something regarding the optimal settings needed for the site.

Regarding the mod, I think that's now a little too light for what I was aiming for, for me it seems to have lost a bit of the moodiness, though you do definitely have more details on the rocks.

Generally I haven't been disabling the IBIS for long exposures as I've never really noticed any lack of sharpness, though I may try some test shots to verify that. I find this lens to be sharpest wide open but I wanted the addition DOF and slower shutter on this.

Tim

dark_lord Plus
15 2.4k 600 England
3 Mar 2016 9:59PM
I like the ethereal nature of shots like this. I also like to see some detail in the water.
It's a balancing act and depending on the movement of the water it's hard to say what shutter speed will work best for any particular effect.

Nevertheless, that extra detail that's been brought out in the mods does help to ground the image, something solid for the eye to lock on, rather than having everything soft. Mind you, you can try to keep the moodiness by applying selective sharpening to the rocks without the lightening.
dudler Plus
16 987 1538 England
4 Mar 2016 9:55PM
I like the mono processing, and the contrast.

I think that you've added a vignette, haven't you? I feel that is a bit heavy (or is it lens fall-off, perhaps?) Either way, it might explain Tanya's comment on the darkness near the edges.

It's often a delicate balance between a vignette that holds in the picture, and one that takes things OTT. A darkroom alternative was to give an extra 10% exposure along each edge, which gives a slightly different look, with smaller corner areas affected. (Easy to do digitally with the burn tool, of course, running it along all the edges.)
blohum 3
5 Mar 2016 10:27AM

Quote:I like the ethereal nature of shots like this. I also like to see some detail in the water.
It's a balancing act and depending on the movement of the water it's hard to say what shutter speed will work best for any particular effect.

Nevertheless, that extra detail that's been brought out in the mods does help to ground the image, something solid for the eye to lock on, rather than having everything soft. Mind you, you can try to keep the moodiness by applying selective sharpening to the rocks without the lightening.



I know what you mean about having some detail in the water, I generally don't go for exposures this long but I felt the rocks offered enough purchase to hold the image together.

Out of interest, when you're mentioning about everything being soft, are you looking at the image as it appears on the page, or are you clicking on it to show it full screen?


Quote:I like the mono processing, and the contrast.

I think that you've added a vignette, haven't you? I feel that is a bit heavy (or is it lens fall-off, perhaps?) Either way, it might explain Tanya's comment on the darkness near the edges.

It's often a delicate balance between a vignette that holds in the picture, and one that takes things OTT. A darkroom alternative was to give an extra 10% exposure along each edge, which gives a slightly different look, with smaller corner areas affected. (Easy to do digitally with the burn tool, of course, running it along all the edges.)



Correct, I have added a vignette... I am rather partial to them and possibly a little heavy-handed at times. I've recently started using the radial filter in Lightroom as you can control the position more easily that with the post-crop vignette tool.


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