Views: 76 (32 Unique) 
Vote 12
Award Shortlist   

Winter Wood

By Ingleman    
First of a series of exposures shot for HDR. New to the concept and still a bit flaky? Comments welcome.

Tags: Landscape Trees Woods Hdr Wildlife and nature

Voters: goodone, GingerC, Billyray and 9 more


Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Comments


Eviscera Plus
9 1.1k 149 United Kingdom
9 Jan 2009 9:43PM
its dreamy but crap mate.

What readings did you take beforehand to set the range and how

Dave

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

9 Jan 2009 9:57PM
Cheers Dave, you've made my day!! (Ha Ha)
Base exposure -1 stop -2 stops -3 stops and +1 stop + 2 stops + 3 stops The HDR image was truly awful, this was tone mapped and sharpened in PS to 180!! Not my cup of tea but wanted to try it out to see what the fuss is about. The jpeg base image is ok without any faffing about. All my attempts at HDR are very soft, needing massive USM. I use a very heavy manfrotto tripod all locked down tight. Tried time release and mirror up. Not sure it's worth the hassle. ps...following instr's to keep aperture the same and only change shutter speed.
9 Jan 2009 9:57PM
Surreal !! I like it!!
Eviscera Plus
9 1.1k 149 United Kingdom
9 Jan 2009 10:03PM
do you know how to take a "reading" dont be shy if you dont, then ill , try and help
Billyray Plus
8 70 3 United Kingdom
9 Jan 2009 10:05PM
I like it, thumbnail caught my eye.
Ray
9 Jan 2009 10:31PM

Quote:Do you know how to take a "reading" dont be shy if you dont, then ill , try and help


Hey Dave I thought I did. I measure for highlights and for shadows. (The dynamic range) Base reading is for midtones. D200 is pretty good at this and not usually a problem, but I guess this technique is different. Lay it on me baby...if I'm going to be spending hard earned dosh on this software I want to be able to use it and get the best from the situation available. By the way...thanks for the offer of help. Very much appreciated! I am more concerned about whether I am using the software properly and whether I need to use all seven exposures. Ta!
ringyneck 9 310 18 United Kingdom
9 Jan 2009 10:40PM
Love it.

keith
Eviscera Plus
9 1.1k 149 United Kingdom
9 Jan 2009 10:49PM
ok mate , im nackered now , but i got the whole weekend off , so ill be right back
RogBrown Plus
9 3.1k 10 England
10 Jan 2009 12:27AM
Andy, this is not the ideal kind of image for HDR. Your camera should cope with this without it, indeed you say that the base image was ok. HDR is best used where you've got extremes of highlights & shadows beyond the range that your camera can handle. Try it indoors, in the house will do to practice. Set the camera on aperture priority & the metering to evaluative (or multi-segment, or whatever Nikon call it) & do 3 exposures at -2, 0, +2. The rest is down to tonemapping & subsequent faffing aroud in PS. Not sure why your results are soft. Probably down to using a Nikon. Wink Hope this helps a bit.
Rog
Brilliant to see you posting again Andy, lovely image Smile
Eviscera Plus
9 1.1k 149 United Kingdom
10 Jan 2009 1:59PM
ello Andy.

Despite the fact that this scene would have been within the capabilities of the cameras Dynamic range , You can HDR hust about any scene / subject you like. So forget that it has to have extremes of highlight or shadow.

Best way I find is to spot meter in aperture priority (you decide d.o.f) and zoom in to the darkest part. Your image may have read as 1/15th at f7 for instance.Write that setting down. Then keep the same ap and zoom to the lightest part (the sky ) and youd get maybe 1/250 at f7. Write that down. Then pick off elements within the scene that attract you , say the trunks , zoom in on spot and write down say the 1/60th at f7. Thats three readings , but if you want more just keep spotting those shutter speeds.

Then compose your scene in aperture priority and choose the focal point)

Then , switch lens to manual focus (it should keep the determined focus point from the above)

Then swith to manual and dial in the shutter speeds you got earlier you wrote down. From the lowest 1/15 to highest 1/250 keeping the ap (F7) constant , remember the app was your choice for depth of field.

Thats the images sorted.

Now in Photomatix , load em up and start with an exposure diff of 1 and 2/3rd ev difference . Its trial and error , if the first default pass on the default tonemap looks crap , try reloading the images at say -2 +2.

You say the base image is ok so you could be really lazy and open the one only raw file in photomatix and let it tonemap that , play with the sliders !

I think the softeness is because you took to many images for a scene with a workable dynamic range and the branches moved or you were a bit pissed when you changed the settings and moved the camera lol.


Hope that helps , have fun mate

Dave
10 Jan 2009 6:47PM

Quote:Andy, this is not the ideal kind of image for HDR. Your camera should cope with this without it, indeed you say that the base image was ok. HDR is best used where you've got extremes of highlights & shadows beyond the range that your camera can handle. Try it indoors, in the house will do to practice. Set the camera on aperture priority & the metering to evaluative (or multi-segment, or whatever Nikon call it) & do 3 exposures at -2, 0, +2. The rest is down to tonemapping & subsequent faffing aroud in PS. Not sure why your results are soft. Probably down to using a Nikon. Hope this helps a bit.

This is useful and I really appreciate the input. I have seen indoors and outdoors HDR and some I like, some I don't..that's the name of the game. I will practise and percy veer!! Cheers Andy
Rog

10 Jan 2009 6:49PM

Quote:Ello Andy.

Despite the fact that this scene would have been within the capabilities of the cameras Dynamic range , You can HDR hust about any scene / subject you like. So forget that it has to have extremes of highlight or shadow.

Best way I find is to spot meter in aperture priority (you decide d.o.f) and zoom in to the darkest part. Your image may have read as 1/15th at f7 for instance.Write that setting down. Then keep the same ap and zoom to the lightest part (the sky ) and youd get maybe 1/250 at f7. Write that down. Then pick off elements within the scene that attract you , say the trunks , zoom in on spot and write down say the 1/60th at f7. Thats three readings , but if you want more just keep spotting those shutter speeds.

Then compose your scene in aperture priority and choose the focal point)

Then , switch lens to manual focus (it should keep the determined focus point from the above)

Then swith to manual and dial in the shutter speeds you got earlier you wrote down. From the lowest 1/15 to highest 1/250 keeping the ap (F7) constant , remember the app was your choice for depth of field.

Thats the images sorted.

Now in Photomatix , load em up and start with an exposure diff of 1 and 2/3rd ev difference . Its trial and error , if the first default pass on the default tonemap looks crap , try reloading the images at say -2 +2.

You say the base image is ok so you could be really lazy and open the one only raw file in photomatix and let it tonemap that , play with the sliders !

I think the softeness is because you took to many images for a scene with a workable dynamic range and the branches moved or you were a bit pissed when you changed the settings and moved the camera lol.


Hope that helps , have fun mate

Dave



Many thanks again...one thing that comes to mind is I may have forgotten to switch to manual focus (although I know that is essential!) The system may have moved the focal point ever so slightly and I guess that would affect the sharpness. I will keep trying and thanks for the advise..always much appreciated. Andy

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.