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Pipes on beach

By abesad
30sec, focal length 21.25mm, f/8,manual, ISO100.
On advice from last photo I took of these pipes, I decided to try on sideways again instead of face on like the other. Unfortunately like last time the sky is very bland. One of these days when I travel to this place I will have a great sky to go with it.

Tags: General Landscape and travel

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This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.

Comments


maryg 7 66 18 Scotland
3 Apr 2009 10:48AM
You have obviously got the bit between your teeth re photographing this scene with the pipes. Now I hope you don't think I am being absolutely negative, but why bother ? Benderloch is such a beautiful area I would have thought there were countless opportunities for exciting and unusual landscapes.
I do like the lines in this with the pipeline and the water's edge forming a nice triangle and the f/g pebbles are good but need som light to bring out all the rich colours. With such strong lines I wondered about going back when it is misty then you would just get a hint of the hills in the b/g and the pipelind disappearing into the mist . perhaps you have some kind of plug in or PS can create a misty effect .
You can see I am no expert but have a weird imaginative streak
Best of luck , will call back later to see other suggestions
Mary

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abesad 7 Scotland
3 Apr 2009 11:29AM

Quote:You have obviously got the bit between your teeth re photographing this scene with the pipes. Now I hope you don't think I am being absolutely negative, but why bother ? Benderloch is such a beautiful area I would have thought there were countless opportunities for exciting and unusual landscapes.
I do like the lines in this with the pipeline and the water's edge forming a nice triangle and the f/g pebbles are good but need som light to bring out all the rich colours. With such strong lines I wondered about going back when it is misty then you would just get a hint of the hills in the b/g and the pipelind disappearing into the mist . perhaps you have some kind of plug in or PS can create a misty effect .
You can see I am no expert but have a weird imaginative streak
Best of luck , will call back later to see other suggestions
Mary



Thank you for your comment.
This is the nearest place to walk with grandson, which is why I took this here, also not able to get up there much and only had part of a day, and can't choose the weather.
Morgs 7 20 62 Wales
3 Apr 2009 12:12PM
The shot (in my view) needs something else to help it. The foreground is very bland and whilst I appreciate that the pipes are the main subject, you need something to lead the eye to them.

Next time, why not look for a rock, log or something that will fill the lower third of the image.

Regards,

David
abesad 7 Scotland
3 Apr 2009 1:54PM

Quote:The shot (in my view) needs something else to help it. The foreground is very bland and whilst I appreciate that the pipes are the main subject, you need something to lead the eye to them.

Next time, why not look for a rock, log or something that will fill the lower third of the image.

Regards,

David



Thanks for comment. It was only after posting, that it clicked that the foreground was empty space, I must work on that.
banehawi Plus
11 1.4k 3422 Canada
3 Apr 2009 2:37PM
Im surprised that nobody has mentioned the shot is yellow!

Starting with this, - it seems white balance is wrong to give such a strong yellow cast. The best approach is to shoot in RAW mode, and then adjust white balance during the raw conversion process on your PC.

Youve managed to get a shot free of vibration and blur for a 30 second exposure, so that in itself is an achievement!

Youre missing an important ingredient with this shot, and the previous one of the same place (the last one is a better shot in my opinion), and thats the light. In both cases the light is poor, - and since photography is all about light, - youre immediately at a disadvantage.

Try better light in the morning, or evening, - good weather is coming soon!

Try shooting this closer to the pipes, so your looking along them, but a little to the side of the pie, not so far away, you will get the added benefit of perspective, so the pipes will be disappearing towards the horizon, which can make an interesting shot. Use a tripod, small aperture (f/16 for example), focus manually about 1/3 the way out (turn off auto focus), then take the shot.


Hope this is helpful.

I loaded a mod thats less yellow as an example.

Regards


Willie
abesad 7 Scotland
3 Apr 2009 2:44PM

Quote:Im surprised that nobody has mentioned the shot is yellow!

Starting with this, - it seems white balance is wrong to give such a strong yellow cast. The best approach is to shoot in RAW mode, and then adjust white balance during the raw conversion process on your PC.

Youve managed to get a shot free of vibration and blur for a 30 second exposure, so that in itself is an achievement!

Youre missing an important ingredient with this shot, and the previous one of the same place (the last one is a better shot in my opinion), and thats the light. In both cases the light is poor, - and since photography is all about light, - youre immediately at a disadvantage.

Try better light in the morning, or evening, - good weather is coming soon!

Try shooting this closer to the pipes, so your looking along them, but a little to the side of the pie, not so far away, you will get the added benefit of perspective, so the pipes will be disappearing towards the horizon, which can make an interesting shot. Use a tripod, small aperture (f/16 for example), focus manually about 1/3 the way out (turn off auto focus), then take the shot.


Hope this is helpful.

I loaded a mod thats less yellow as an example.

Regards


Willie



Thank you for your remarks, looking at and comparing it with yours I see I have got the colouring wrong, even though I shot in RAW.I used a tripod, forgot to mention that in comments. Thank you for showing me how the image could look, that was a great help.
banehawi Plus
11 1.4k 3422 Canada
3 Apr 2009 6:28PM
Susan, - some more info on RAW.

Shooting in RAW is only the first step. What you can do with your RAW conversion, - dont know which software you use, - but most have a white balance tool. You select the tool and click it on a neutral part of the image, - grey or white for example, and it will select the white balance. Even better would be if you included a grey card in your original shot to use as the area to click on on post processing, - try it, - it works.

W
abesad 7 Scotland
3 Apr 2009 6:34PM

Quote:Susan, - some more info on RAW.

Shooting in RAW is only the first step. What you can do with your RAW conversion, - dont know which software you use, - but most have a white balance tool. You select the tool and click it on a neutral part of the image, - grey or white for example, and it will select the white balance. Even better would be if you included a grey card in your original shot to use as the area to click on on post processing, - try it, - it works.

W



Hi again, thank for info, I heard about carrying a grey card, but still not sure what you do with it. I didn't know about the clicking on a neutral part of the image. I use element 6 mostly, but have cs3.
banehawi Plus
11 1.4k 3422 Canada
3 Apr 2009 10:32PM
Use CS3 for RAW conversion. The only thing you would do with a grey card (you can buy one for quite cheap) is to include it in a shot to use it for clicking on when you open the image in RAW. THis will set your white balance, then you can apply that white balance to all the shots youve taken in the same light, under the same conditions.

White balance means the colour temperature, and when you click on the gret card, or a neutral are, RAW will set it appropriately. Its measured as degrees Kelvin, - do for example, 5000K is daylight.

The reason you need neutral or a grey card, - which is neutral, being 125 Red, 125 Blue, and 128 Green, - is that you want an area that doen not have one colour dominant, - ot the white balance will be set incorrectly.

You can also use you camera to set white balance to the conditions, - not as reliable or accurate, but might work. So rather than set to Auto WB, - if its cloudy, set it to Cloudy WB


Hope this helps.


Willie

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