Back Modifications (4)
Views 72 Unique 31 Award Shortlist   

Oval Forum

By AM74
Currently in Jordan and took this shot in Jerash- a city in Jordan with one of the most complete Greco-Roman ruins in the world. I was really chuffed that I could get the sun rays coming through as I wanted them but really cross with myself for not focussing on composition and not getting the first column in full. Have just cropped it slightly, and made minor adjustments in Lr.

Tags: Sunlight Architecture Roman ruins

Comments


ddolfelin Plus
8 103 3 Wales
29 Dec 2017 5:00AM
Very impressive work!
dudler Plus
17 1.3k 1696 England
29 Dec 2017 8:14AM
I like this, and envy you the opportunity of shooting so early!

I'm away from home, too, and operating on a tablet-style laptop, which doesn't always obey me - it also runs Elements, and I have mainly used PS CC for the last year or so, and some of the tools are different... So no edit coming.

There's a touch of magenta in this, for my taste - but you may like it, or consider it's truer to the scene you saw. The only other thing I'm tempted to do is to straighten the verticals a bit (but no completely, as that always looks unnatural), and that's the bit of Elements that is defying me at present...

Nice work, and an opportunity well taken.

mrswoolybill Plus
13 2.3k 2265 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2017 9:15AM
Jerash is an amazing site, as far as I remember the largest extant Greco-Roman city apart from Rome itself, and it was only rediscovered in the 20th Century. It's over 20 years since I was there but I remember this well.

Well done for the creative use of the low sun. I'll second John's comments above, I'd like to rotate to get the central columns nearer to true, then slightly adjust verticals.

I'd just add that I would not have used a minus exposure compensation here. I think this could be lightened a little without loss of atmosphere.

Mono could also be interesting.

I shall look out for more good memories...

Moira
paulbroad 13 131 1289 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2017 10:56AM
Can anyone else see the double imaging? There is considerable camera movement here in the vertical plane resulting in the whole image being rather in-sharp. Either that or the Christmas booze hasn't fully worn off. I would have been at ISO400 to get more shutter speed as it cannot be the gear.

Paul
mrswoolybill Plus
13 2.3k 2265 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2017 12:24PM

Quote:Can anyone else see the double imaging?

When I first opened I thought I was seeing some sort of ghosting along the top of the wall background centre left. But looking closely it's a line of wire fencing.
pamelajean Plus
14 1.4k 2157 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2017 5:00PM
You say you made a minor adjustment, but I am wondering if you lifted the shadows on this image, Annie. Shooting into the sun will have given you quite a dark image, and you used negative exposure compensation, making it even darker.

The second modification, the black and white version, looks good, and seems to suit this architecture. It also gets rid of the magenta cast.

Well done for getting the sun peeping through the columns and the ray of light on the ground. The straightening is a good idea, and the image looks a lot better for it. I like the way you captured the perspective of the columns and also the curves of the stones in the foreground.

I have done a modification where I chose to use black and white, then increased the contrast. I used perspective correction to get the verticals straight, and cropped to put the upward slope of the top of the pillars into the top right corner, thereby reducing some of the expanse of sky at the same time.

Pamela.
banehawi Plus
16 2.3k 4163 Canada
29 Dec 2017 5:57PM
Theres ben quite a bit of post processing.

Great place for the image and well done to get the sun shining through.

Theres is some horrendous lens distortion and tilting verticals that cab be addressed. that particular lens at 24mm has severer barrel distortion, despite being an L lens, but it can be fixed in post processing.


I loaded a mod with this done, the expsure corrected, (its well underexposed) the purple/magenta colour cast removed, etc. I removed that stairway in the distance also.


Regards

Willie
JuBarney Plus
9 33 5 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2017 9:08PM

I love Willie's mod.
Ju
29 Dec 2017 9:41PM
Thanks to all of you for your helpful comments, feedback and modifications. I love all the mods especially Willie's. Love the fact that you could make the whole staircase disappear!
I only realised today that the image stabiliser button on the lens had inadvertently been turned off, perhaps that is the reason image was not very sharp.
I think it is really cool Moira that you have been to Jaresh too! Grin I will be boring you to death with photos of Jordan in coming days. Yours and Pamela's comments re negative exposure and lifting shadows not necessary are taken on board. Also appreciate that you both explained how you did the mods.
Much appreciated.
dudler Plus
17 1.3k 1696 England
30 Dec 2017 9:48PM
At 24mm and 1/80, I'd be surprised if there was a shake problem, even without IS.

Rule of thumb, as it was in 1970 - 28mm, 1/30 second. 200mm, 1/250 (rounding to the nearest available shutter speed, in each case: we only had full-stop increments than - none of hte current 1/160 or 1/200 stuff back then!)
1 Jan 2018 10:45AM
Thanks John for the above, and this may seem like a really ignorant comment, but I mainly use Av mode, so expect the camera to choose shutter speed for me- does the camera not follow the rule of thumb? Also with Av, should I be deciding the ISO or keeping it at Auto?

By the way, thanks a lot for all your help in 2017 and happy new year!
Annie
dudler Plus
17 1.3k 1696 England
1 Jan 2018 10:58AM
Hi, Annie -

It's all part of the learning process - every question needs an answer, and we're here to give them.

The camera will choose the shutter speed to give the right exposure - it may give you a warning if the shutter speed is low, but not all bodies do that. I'm not a Canon user, so I'm not sure: Sony have had this since at least 2008, and my Minolta (Sony took over hteir business in 2005-6) had it in their DSLRs. It's liek a car with an automatic gearbox - it does some stuff, but the cleverer it is, the brighter you need to be to spot when it may struggle.

I'd suggest choosing your own ISO, and monitoring it and the effect it has. Eventually, it becomes instinctive to watch what hte shutter speed is doing, and to change the ISO according to conditions (brightness of light, shutter/aperture that you want combined).

Keep the questions coming!

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.