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Butterfly

By borrower
How do I make the Butterfly sharper in the photograph

Tags: Wildlife and nature

Voters: LynneJoyce, KarenFB, zebraboy and 3 more


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Comments


LynneJoyce Plus
13 22 101 United Kingdom
1 Aug 2009 3:42AM
I think it is one of the Burnet moths rather than a butterfly. See

http://www.butterflygarden.co.uk/moths.htm

As for sharpning the moth, I find Nik Color Efex Pro's tonal contrast filter very useful for this. First I lassoed loosely around the moth giving a margin, then Select>Modify>Feather Using a value of 30 for this small image, then I applied the filter. It does it on a separate layer so you can alter the transparency to adjust the effect.
KarenFB Plus
15 5.8k 183 England
1 Aug 2009 7:10AM
Hi Louise, welcome to EPZ.

This is a gorgeous 5-spot Burnet moth, rather an old one which explains why the wings aren't as bright as they could be. You've caught it well and I like the inclusion of it's surroundings.
Pete 20 18.8k 97 England
1 Aug 2009 8:38AM
You could also try moving closer so it becomes bigger in the frame. For this you need a close up or macro lens. The least expensive option is one that screws on the front of your lens, often called a close up filter. Buy one in +3 or +4 strength and you'll get much close photos. If this is an area you're going to specialise in consider investing in a macro lens.
We have a guide to all the options here Macro Photography Accessories
borrower 12 4 England
1 Aug 2009 2:12PM

Quote:I think it is one of the Burnet moths rather than a butterfly. See

http://www.butterflygarden.co.uk/moths.htm

As for sharpning the moth, I find Nik Color Efex Pro's tonal contrast filter very useful for this. First I lassoed loosely around the moth giving a margin, then Select>Modify>Feather Using a value of 30 for this small image, then I applied the filter. It does it on a separate layer so you can alter the transparency to adjust the effect.


Quote:I think it is one of the Burnet moths rather than a butterfly. See

http://www.butterflygarden.co.uk/moths.htm

As for sharpning the moth, I find Nik Color Efex Pro's tonal contrast filter very useful for this. First I lassoed loosely around the moth giving a margin, then Select>Modify>Feather Using a value of 30 for this small image, then I applied the filter. It does it on a separate layer so you can alter the transparency to adjust the effect.

borrower 12 4 England
1 Aug 2009 2:33PM
Thank you Lynne for your comment and advice. Very helpful, but as a beginner I am still not yet too ok with photography language, will have to study and read up. As I am still learning with my camera.
borrower 12 4 England
1 Aug 2009 2:34PM

Quote:Hi Louise, welcome to EPZ.

This is a gorgeous 5-spot Burnet moth, rather an old one which explains why the wings aren't as bright as they could be. You've caught it well and I like the inclusion of it's surroundings.

borrower 12 4 England
1 Aug 2009 2:37PM
Theres me me thinking it was a butterfly... but thank you for your kind comment, nice to think I've caught it well and the surroundings. Hope to one day maybe take photographs as brilliant as I have seen on the website by everyone. Practice Practice...
borrower 12 4 England
1 Aug 2009 2:38PM

Quote:You could also try moving closer so it becomes bigger in the frame. For this you need a close up or macro lens. The least expensive option is one that screws on the front of your lens, often called a close up filter. Buy one in +3 or +4 strength and you'll get much close photos. If this is an area you're going to specialise in consider investing in a macro lens.
We have a guide to all the options here Macro Photography Accessories

borrower 12 4 England
1 Aug 2009 2:40PM
Thank you for your advice about the lens, and how I can improve taking close up shots.

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