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Activity

dudler

I hope you enjoy my pictures half as much as I have... Preferably more than half!
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A quick view of dudler's recent activity.

  • Dreamland Style

    What aperture did you actually have set on the Helios? The camera gets no data from a manual lens, and seems to have defaulted to f/1.4.

    The Helios has decent sharpness, but quite low contrast, as befits a Russian ripoff of a prewar Zeiss design, without modern multicoating. Contrast adjustment wil lbe needed, i think, in all but the msot contrasty light.

    I must see what mine does on a CSC: there's one knocking around on a Zenit B somewhere in the house...
    • 29 Sep 2016 4:30PM
  • Engineering works

    To answer the question: yes.

    Willie's mod looks about optimum, but the ground is stil las muddy in tone as in reality. It sticks to your shoes...

    Smile
    • 29 Sep 2016 4:26PM
  • Chomondeley castle 2

    To get it right in camera, you need the camera back to be absolutely vertical, and untilted. Some cameras now have built-in levels: and you can easily get little bubble spirit levels to fit your hot shoe.

    However, doing htat here would leave you needing a far wider lens, and with a massive amount of grass to crop off at the bottom.

    And, as Moira and Willie say, you don't necessarily want verticals perfect all the time. The big problem is where they are a bit out, and it looks like a mistake. (Although some people - including me - suggest that a tiny bit of converging vertical is necessary to avoid looking overcorrected.)
    • 29 Sep 2016 4:21PM
  • Chomondeley Castle

    I'll add a tiny bit to the '1/3 in' idea...

    If you are going for landscape perfection, you'd want the nearest blade of grass pinsharp as the castle. In the real world, for family and friends, from twenty feet to infinity will be ample: no-one will look at the grass closest to the bottom of the frame.

    Compositionally, I might have gone a little closer and to the right, framing the castle with the tree, rather than obscuring part of it. My mod shows how I'd use the foreground shadow as part of the frame.
    • 29 Sep 2016 4:16PM
  • Character!

    I wondered about a square crop (uploaded), which really doesn't work.

    Two things I'd like to see different... First, a fraction more room at the bottom - I reckon his chin will have as much character as the rest of him. And either more profile of fuller face, as the thick glasses and thick frames conceal his eye... The plus was that he couldn't see you - I bet he'd have spotted yo uand called you on taking his picture if he'd had a clearer line of sight! (Though conversation and a cuppa might well have led to great insight and twenty more characterful portraits.)
    • 29 Sep 2016 4:10PM
  • the FRONT of HAMILTON'S ONTARIO CITY HALL in B&W

    I am not sure that your conversion method has made the most of the picture.

    Could you post the full-size colour image, unedited, so that we can try some options out, please?
    • 29 Sep 2016 4:05PM
  • Here be monsters

    The perils of a spoolchucker on a laptop.

    Gunneras can get very large...
    • 28 Sep 2016 9:19PM
  • You haven't been a member for long, Laura, but you already seem to be someone to watch carefully - a series of thoughtful and beautiful pictures.

    I hope that you will be able to post pictures daily for a very long time to come. And I will enjoy every single one of them.
  • I keep finding pictures in yoru portfolio that make me insanely jealous... We live in the same world, but you see it far better than I do!

    Some of the very best, the most creative, the most emotionally engaging work on the site.
  • Simply, the most consistently brilliant and perceptive portfolio on Ephotozine.

    There are many good photographers on here. Some outstanding ones. But over the last few months, you've consistently posted work that is, in some sense, utterly alien, as well as being totally human.

    No pressure, truly. If you decided to stick to unprocessed pictures of used car dealers for the rest of your life, you have produced better work than I ever will: I suspect I speak for a lot of other members in saying this.
    • Posted on IsabelC's profile
    • 15 Jul 2015 6:45PM
  • Some lovely observations here - and all seen through a finely-tuned eye!
  • Marian -

    You have a rare talent, infusing every picture with emotion and resonance. You see the relationships between things and people, between thoughts and emotions, and yo ushare them through your pictures.

    Thank you.
    • Posted on Potra's profile
    • 1 Apr 2014 11:37AM
  • A portfolio that never disappoints. A long series of lovely views, beautifully shot.
  • I love Rhodes, and particularly Lindos.

    This portfolio reminds me why I want to go back there for another holiday - the warm sun, the ancient buildings, the friendly people and the lovely food and wine...

    George - you're so lucky to live there - and I am so glad you share the view!
  • Careful, hard-working and methodical. Beautiful and thoughtful results.
    • Posted on Chant57's profile
    • 3 Nov 2013 1:57PM
  • They say artists transform suffering into beauty.

    You are a true artist.
    • Posted on NDODS's profile
    • 24 Apr 2013 3:16PM
  • Some lovely, old-fashioned reportage here. Zappy colour and a lack of time and thought are popular these days: this is a wonderful antidote - especially from a young tog!