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Scan

dudler

Time for an update: I still use film, though. Not vast quantities, but I have a darkroom, and I'm not afraid to use it.

I enjoy every image I take: I hope you'll enjoy looking at them.
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Scan

21 Apr 2020 8:56AM   Views : 381 Unique : 237

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So youíve got your negatives. In a day or two, I will be taking you deep into the darkroom (Iím hoping that my Alpha 7ís stellar ISO will allow me to show you exactly what goes on under the enlarger lens).

But today, weíre looking at the quick route from dry negatives to positive posting and printing. And this will be a short blog, because this bit is really simple.

You WILL need a reasonable scanner, but the good news is that you donít need to buy anything expensive. There are four types to choose from:

1 cheap and cheerful film scanners, around £100: I have no personal experience of these, but they are clearly popular with people who have loads of negatives and slides to digitise. Built to a price, to do a decent job Ė Iíll be very grateful if anyone with experience of these can add a comment about how they work in practice;
2 high-quality film scanners, designed to wring the maximum quality from any negative or slide, and exemplified by the series of excellent devices that Minolta and Nikon produced a while back. Currently, Plustek seems to be the name to look for;
3 pro-grade scanners: the likes of Hasselblad are in the game, but Iíve lumped a lot of kit together in one category, on the basis that you and I donít have the budget for them. Theyíre designed to scan fast and impeccably, in running-all-day environments. Some are aimed at sheer quality: others are designed to be used in processing labs where feeding a whole film in at once leads to a set of scanned images in under a minute; and
4 flatbed scanners with a second light source to allow them to scan translucent materials as well as reflective ones. My Epson V550 is in this category.

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Negatives (emulsion side up) in the scanner carrier, curling up, before hte top part of the carrier is clamped down.

Once youíve got the scanner plugged in and set up, set the resolution as high as you want it (in most cases, this will be as high as it goes!), and feed in/place the negatives. And press the button. My Epson takes 10-15 minutes to scan twelve 35mm negatives at 4800 dpi.

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Carrier closed, and ready to have the scanner lid down.
One final thing, though. You wonít have a complete image yet. You will have a finished image. If you shot in soft light, or if you underdeveloped the film a little, youíll need to increase contrast, and vice versa. So take your time in Photoshop Ė correct the framing, level the horizon, use Levels or Curves to get the tonal range as you want it.

And then post for Film FridayÖ

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View of the scanner with the lid open: the dark area in the lid houses a second light source which shines through the film in the film carrier. it's large enough to scantwo strips of 35mm film, or one strip of 120 film.

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Comments

mistere Avatar
mistere Plus
10 37 8 England
21 Apr 2020 11:11AM
Thanks John.
That got me thinking about how i could scan some of my old negatives on my printer scanner.
Did a bit of googeling and found this...
https://www.popphoto.com/gear/2011/07/how-to-scan-negatives-using-standard-scanners/
I'm sure i can rig up a method of backlighting the negatives.
That's my project for today SmileSmileSmile Could be fun.
dudler Avatar
dudler Plus
20 2.1k 2048 England
21 Apr 2020 1:18PM
Now, that's thinking outside the box!

I'll be interested in the results. One potential limitation (and it may be less of a limitation than I think) is resolution - allegedly, the V550 goes to 6400dpi, while copying a document only needs 300dpi for same-size reproduction. I suspect that most go higher than that, though.

Please report back to the 60 other people who've read this so far, as well as letting me know...
mistere Avatar
mistere Plus
10 37 8 England
21 Apr 2020 6:21PM
Well, it works. Still need to play around with the scanner settings and the backlight but i have got a few images to play with. Resolution isn't a problem, the scanner goes up to 9200 dpi,
So far i've only tried it as high as 1200. Will continue with the experiment tomorow. SmileSmile
mistere Avatar
mistere Plus
10 37 8 England
21 Apr 2020 6:50PM
Best attempt so far. SmileSmile
238193_1587491403.jpg
dudler Avatar
dudler Plus
20 2.1k 2048 England
21 Apr 2020 7:18PM
I can only comment biddy-biddy-biddy!
pablophotographer Avatar
pablophotographer 12 2.2k 450
21 Apr 2020 11:33PM

Quote:Thanks John.
That got me thinking about how i could scan some of my old negatives on my printer scanner.
Did a bit of googeling and found this...
https://www.popphoto.com/gear/2011/07/how-to-scan-negatives-using-standard-scanners/
I'm sure i can rig up a method of backlighting the negatives.
That's my project for today SmileSmileSmile Could be fun.



Wow! I had attempted with my multi scanner printer without much success but the idea of aluminium foil rather than the white backing of the scanner lid. Discussion does bring out useful ideas!
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