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The Wild and Wacky World of JPEG

johnriley1uk

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The Wild and Wacky World of JPEG

26 Jul 2021 9:08AM   Views : 314 Unique : 201

Without getting into the RAW vs JPEG arguments, for those who use JPEG capture there are a number of picture styles available, as well as all sorts of digital filters. This is subtly different to shooting RAW and then aplying filters, because it implies instead that we have a particular intent before the shutter button is pressed. So we look at our subject, decide what we are trying to achieve with it, and shoot around that, maybe or maybe not using the various image styles that we have at our disposal. Likewise, just like loading a camera with a particular type of film, we set a style and then go out and seek images for that style. The obvious example is monochrome, where using a mono setting means that we look for suitable subjects right from the start, which is a totally different mindset to shooting in colour.

I came across this small building in one of the speciality gardens at Rounddhay Park. I had the SMC Pentax-F 17-28mm Fisheye Zoom on the Pentax K-1 full frame DSLR and decided to see what effects I could dial in to make, perhaps, this quirky building even more quirky.

Natural. This is my usual setting.
22471_1627286566.jpg


Vibrant.
22471_1627286603.jpg


Radiant.
22471_1627286630.jpg


Bleach Bypass.
22471_1627286654.jpg


Monochrome.
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Cross processing.
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Of course, the parameters can be changed for all of these settings, so the amount of control possible is amazing.

Comments


26 Jul 2021 10:43AM
My own approach is that I go out and look for a subject, invariably shoot 'standard' colour jpeg, usually set to low contrast, and decide later on processing. The subject is the raw material and so it comes first... like Ansel's negative being the 'score'... then later the approach to processing that might best express my response to that subject, rather like Ansel's print being the 'performance.'

Quote: "we set a style and then go out and seek images for that style. The obvious example is monochrome, where using a mono setting means that we look for suitable subjects right from the start,"

Each to his own of course, but for me personally that would be very much a case of putting the cart before the horse.

Alan

P.S. And Fuji jpegs seem very robust... I've found no advantage in using RAW.
26 Jul 2021 6:01PM
P.P.S. And on reflection, John, I note that throughout this blog you use the personal pronoun "we." ..."we" set a style..,. "we"look for suitable subjects"...,
Is there really such a consensus? Personally, I hope not.
26 Jul 2021 6:06PM
I was just referring to myself and Sue, not suggesting that what I think is the general consensus. It seemed to dilute using "I" as I didn't want to sound too much me, me, me, me.......Smile
26 Jul 2021 6:22PM
Thanks for that clarification. We each of us find our own path to what we want our photography to do for us.
mrswoolybill Plus
14 2.9k 2457 United Kingdom
27 Jul 2021 3:57PM
I think everyone has their own personal map for how they arrive at an image. I shoot Raw, and avoid any in-camera effects like the plague because they reduce options later and can produce truly horrible results. But when I line up a shot in the viewfinder I have a very clear idea of how I want it to turn out, 'intent' in your words, which reflects how I actually see it. That tends to be in mono, because primarily I see lines, spatial relationships, juxtaposition, I only very rarely take any notice of colour. And it tends to be in a square frame. That's usually what is in my mind as I take the shot, and subsequently it's a matter of getting to that mental image.
I'm an opportunist. I don't go out with a view to taking a particular photo, or even a particular kind of photo, I respond to what I see, and how I see it. Often a theme will develop, as my obsessive streak comes to the fore.
Everyone is different.

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