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Separate Ways

By kimi012
I took this shot from my balcony. So, basically I was trying to capture some interesting shots of pigeons and then I saw this in my viewfinder. It was peculiar in a sense that the boy in the background and the pigeon in the foreground were both looking their separate ways without them even knowing.

Tags: Photo journalism Fun Boy Bird Black and white Humour Directions

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Comments


PranavMishra 9 52 18 India
5 Jan 2016 6:38AM
Grin Grin good one.. Grin
mrswoolybill Plus
14 2.9k 2457 United Kingdom
5 Jan 2016 8:42AM
Hi Kimi, welcome to the Critique Gallery, I think this is your first upload in our little corner.

You joined the site a few months ago, so I guess you know what the CG is about. You forego the chance of votes and awards in the hope of getting more detailed, helpful comments.

First off, I love this because it does what only photography can do - it captures the moment. It also creates a relationship between living creatures and their environment, and between each other, that they themselves are entirely unaware of. In a sense it's street photography moved up a few floors.

It's beautifully composed, using those diagonal cables as a frame and to connect the boy with the pigeon. Although they are looking their separate ways they are closely linked visually.

Looking at your portfolio you are good at this - finding the tidy, satisfying story in life's untidy messiness. That's the photographer's eye.

Focus on the pigeon is spot on, it's the element that is in front of our eyes and we need to see it sharp. The shutter speed was fast enough to prevent camera or subject movement. What this did need though, I think, was rather more depth of field to give a little more detail in the boy's face. His gaze is so important to the composition.

That meant a smaller aperture - higher F number - and that in turn needed a higher ISO setting. Swings and roundabouts, as we say - you juggle settings to get the right balance, and that's the way I would have gone.

The only other point I would add, in terms of composition, is that this would be a wee bit stronger if that lower cable hit the bottom left corner, that gives a sense of stability, it anchors a line. But cropping here would take the boy too close to the edge of the frame.

The black & white conversion is good - normally we ask to see the colour original, you could add that as a Before & after version, or as a modification. But I would be happy with this conversion.

Well done, it's good to see adventurous, thoughtful work here - making pictures not just taking them. I hope we'll see more from you in the Critique gallery.
Moira
kimi012 6 1 India
5 Jan 2016 9:38AM
Thank you Moira for the detailed critique. It was very helpful and I'll keep your suggestions in mind when I photograph. Smile
paulbroad 14 131 1293 United Kingdom
5 Jan 2016 10:29AM
Quite nice but, despite your comment, I would prefer the pigeon looking into the frame, not out of it.

You are a touch over exposed as shown on the pigeon with some burnt out areas. You should not use spot metering on an automatic setting unless you meter, then use shutter lock and recompose. What have you metered from? It should have been the pigeon but I suspect it was a rather darker area.

If you use spot, you MUST meter from a tone equating to 8% grey. Do you know what that looks like. It is the most ccurate method of metering providing it is correctly used. Here, you needed -1 stop exposure compensation.

Paul
dudler Plus
18 1.7k 1877 England
5 Jan 2016 10:56AM
And welcome from me, too, Kimi.

Moira has covered just about everything in her usual thoughtful way. I love the mirror effect between pigeon and human, which is the beating heart of the shot: the cables are the sinews holding the body of the shot together.

Smaller aperture and more depth of field - possibly combined with careful choice of the plane of sharpest focus - would make the relationship clearer. Don't be afraid to increase ISO - often, digital noise is a worthwhile price to pay for sharpness where you want it.

In my mod, I've tightened the crop to try to make the opposition of the he, and brightened the shadows a touch using Adobe Camera Raw.
pamelajean Plus
15 1.6k 2238 United Kingdom
5 Jan 2016 5:55PM
Welcome to the Critique Gallery, Kimi.
I have enjoyed looking at the pictures in your portfolio. They show creative thinking and an out-of-the-box type of photography, which I admire.

I have little to add to what has already been said.
I like the way you have the lines and the pigeon sharp, with the background blurred. However, part of me wants to have the boy in focus as well. I don't think it detracts from an excellent shot, but it would be nice.
However, changing your settings (from taking shots of just pigeons) and getting it right may not have been easy, and the moment might have been lost. That's the danger.

I feel that neither the pigeon nor the boy had any idea that they were interacting in this way, if they were aware of each other at all. That's the beauty of what you have captured. YOU are aware, they are not.

Pamela.
kimi012 6 1 India
6 Jan 2016 4:18PM

Quote:Quite nice but, despite your comment, I would prefer the pigeon looking into the frame, not out of it.

You are a touch over exposed as shown on the pigeon with some burnt out areas. You should not use spot metering on an automatic setting unless you meter, then use shutter lock and recompose. What have you metered from? It should have been the pigeon but I suspect it was a rather darker area.

If you use spot, you MUST meter from a tone equating to 8% grey. Do you know what that looks like. It is the most ccurate method of metering providing it is correctly used. Here, you needed -1 stop exposure compensation.

Paul




Thanks Paul, especially for the exposure compensation tip. I also went through shutter lock and the spot metering do's and dont's!

Kimi
kimi012 6 1 India
6 Jan 2016 4:26PM

Quote:And welcome from me, too, Kimi.

Moira has covered just about everything in her usual thoughtful way. I love the mirror effect between pigeon and human, which is the beating heart of the shot: the cables are the sinews holding the body of the shot together.

Smaller aperture and more depth of field - possibly combined with careful choice of the plane of sharpest focus - would make the relationship clearer. Don't be afraid to increase ISO - often, digital noise is a worthwhile price to pay for sharpness where you want it.

In my mod, I've tightened the crop to try to make the opposition of the he, and brightened the shadows a touch using Adobe Camera Raw.



Thank you for the mod. The wire at the corner does make it a little stronger. Coming to the plane of sharpest focus, I tried to keep the pigeon in focus. How could have I done it differently to make the realtionship clearer?

Kimi
kimi012 6 1 India
6 Jan 2016 4:28PM

Quote:Welcome to the Critique Gallery, Kimi.
I have enjoyed looking at the pictures in your portfolio. They show creative thinking and an out-of-the-box type of photography, which I admire.

I have little to add to what has already been said.
I like the way you have the lines and the pigeon sharp, with the background blurred. However, part of me wants to have the boy in focus as well. I don't think it detracts from an excellent shot, but it would be nice.
However, changing your settings (from taking shots of just pigeons) and getting it right may not have been easy, and the moment might have been lost. That's the danger.

I feel that neither the pigeon nor the boy had any idea that they were interacting in this way, if they were aware of each other at all. That's the beauty of what you have captured. YOU are aware, they are not.

Pamela.



Thank you Pamela!

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