Turn Your Old Camera Into Cash With An Instant Quote From MPB

Activity : All Comments

sjcphotography

...Read More
Profile
  • I will try the reset, then I'll have to consider a repair, or replacement. I will be having a look at repair costs.


    Quote:

    Hope there will be some Nikon users chipping in here. To me it sounds like a visit to the repair shop. If there is a way to reset the camera and reset all custom settings, try that first.

  • I've tried the various modes in AF-C and the three points mentioned don't light up. I can check again, but I am not expecting it to be any different.


    Quote:AF-S is single shot mode, no tracking. When you have the three visible, can you select any one of the three on its own, in the same usual way used to select a single focus point. When you shoot, either way, does one or all of the three points flash to confirm focus?
  • Thank you for your comment. I never use the 3D mode, so no. I first noticed the issue when I was in AF-S single point mode, I have tried changing into several modes. If I am in AF-S, single point, AF-C, single, dynamic, or 3D. the issue still remains.


    Quote:Do you have the AF area mode set to 3D 11 points when this is happening
  • I have noticed that three of the eleven focus points have stopped lighting up. Is this something that occurs through wear, or something that I have done?

    I have taken shots with the three focus points that no longer light up and this issue doesn't seem to affect image sharpness. The upper left, upper middle and the the far right points are of issue here.

    Would I be able to fix this myself, or would the repair have to been done by a repair centre?

    Thank you for all replies.
  • There are known issues with the original Nikon made tripod collar at slower shutter speeds, resulting in signs of camera shake.

    I wonder if anyone has used the Kirk replacement and original collar, who can advise me on the performance of the Kirk collar?

    All advice appreciated, thank you.

    Steven
  • I want to express my appreciation, as above. I also want to thank all of you who have commented on my forum posts, with helpful advice and insight. I have also had useful advice by PM. I am still learning and striving to improve.

    I must also thank all posters who have uploaded photos I have enjoyed and perhaps taken inspiration from. I look forward to checking new images everyday. It occurs to me that when we look at images, I think we tend not to give much, or any thought to the challenges, difficulties and frustrations photographers have experienced in capturing those images we are viewing, or the images that made it to the recycle bin!

    I also look forward to uploading further images.

    Steven

  • I got the new hide set up yesterday. It was very welcome, as it started raining quite heavily and continued for several hours! I sat in the hide while the rain continued. I didn't see much, but a few Pheasants, a Grey Heron and cattle.

    It was a pain to lug it about to where I set it up, as I was also carrying a camera bag, tripod, with DSLR and 300mm telephoto. I decided to leave it where I set it up! I didn't much like the idea of collapsing and carrying the muckle thing home after Sunset. I hope it is still where I left it!
  • Thank you to all for your input. I will try and bare in mind what you have said for future.
  • I do remember such a situation when I thought I had seen the best off the Sunset! I had packed up and I was heading home, until I saw the gorgeous colours behind me, which prompted me to quickly set my camera up again to capture the scene before it was too late!

    The real pain though is when you think nothing is going to happen so you pack all your kit away and suddenly the western sky erupts (briefly !!) in a blaze of colour !!Sad
    That said, if it was predictable it would be less of a challenge.


  • Tonight, I looked out of my kitchen window to see a spectacular red Sunset, which is my personal favourite. I don't see it all that often. I felt dismayed that I was missing it, but I did at least get a few shots from upstairs. Smile

    Could anyone advise me on how to accurately know how good the Sunset will be? I know that if there is complete cloud cover, or lots of clouds, then obviously the Sunset will be forgettable, as most, or all of the light is being stifled by the clouds. Are there any good website guides on what to look for? I'd like to improve my knowledge to work towards greater understanding of Sunsets, so i can have a better idea of what to expect before the main event.

    Thank you to all for your replies on this post and my previous post about photo hides.

    Steven

  • Quote:I bought a chair hide several years back, which was quite cheap. It worked really well and remained intact through a lot of use for 2-3 yrs.
    I now use it in my darkroom for transferring films into developing tanks, which also works well.
    Only cost 60 or there abouts.
    Like this:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Camo-Pop-Up-Chair-Hide-Quick-Erect-Decoying-Shooting-Photography-Tent-Waterproof-/192192614631



    I received the chair hide today and I set it up indoors to try it out. It's very easy to set up, with plenty of space inside for my camera mounted on a tripod, my camera bag, with ample room to move around, so I am not cramped. Collapsing the hide and putting back into the carry bag is quick and easy. I would say it has been made to a high standard and will be very useful, whenever I can put it full use. I have only ever used fixed hides, so it will be interesting to see how it goes.

    From first impressions, I think a few revisions would be good. I'd like to see camo mesh around all of the windows, but not the zip entrance. Even camo mesh just around the two front windows would be welcomed. I may get a camo net to put over the top to cover the side windows, so I can look out without being spotted! With my lense through the semi-circular windows, I can only zip it closed about halfway. I have a small piece of camo mesh that I can use to fill the open area around my lense. I wondered if a vent on the top could be useful to stop it getting too hot inside, which can be zipped closed, such as if it's raining!

    Thank you for the link and recommendation. The same goes to all who gave me their input.
  • Cover blown! Blush I will bare that in mind when setting the hide up. I will be able to use vegetation once it has grown some more. I will investigate my available options.


    Quote:
    Quote:I am considering setting up the chair hide in a good spot and leaving it. I rarely see anyone, other than Farmers and dog walkers, so it should stay where I leave it! I remember Chris Packham talking about going to a spot where had a hide permanently in place, just to confronted with an empty space!


    It does happen sadly, try to choose somewhere where there is some natural cover too, this will help to conceal your hide that little bit better, also make sure you peg it down well, a good gust of wind can take them for quite a journey, I watched one of mine travel to the other side of a field. Yes there is room for a tripod, one leg to the front and two to the side to give room for your legs and bags, if needed the front facing leg can poke out the front of the hide.

  • I am considering setting up the chair hide in a good spot and leaving it. I rarely see anyone, other than Farmers and dog walkers, so it should stay where I leave it! I remember Chris Packham talking about going to a spot where had a hide permanently in place, just to confronted with an empty space!


    Quote:It part depends on what sort of photography you have in mind.
    I use a chair type hide as I am usually at one site for at least two hours.
    Wildlife can take 15 minutes or more to accept a new hide.
    Chair hides are relatively heavy because of the chair, but comfortable with space for a tripod forward of the chair, a camera bag, mine has a cup holder for a drink, and they have side as well as the front vent for a big lens.

  • I am awaiting delivery of the hide, as it has been despatched. I hope there is adequate space for tripod use? I am looking forward to trying it out.


    Quote:I bought a chair hide several years back, which was quite cheap. It worked really well and remained intact through a lot of use for 2-3 yrs.
    I now use it in my darkroom for transferring films into developing tanks, which also works well.
    Only cost 60 or there abouts.
    Like this:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Camo-Pop-Up-Chair-Hide-Quick-Erect-Decoying-Shooting-Photography-Tent-Waterproof-/192192614631

  • I wonder if they started to see you as a Badger. I would absolutely love that and it would be a special experience.


    Quote:
    Quote:One hide will be a great start. They may already be familiar with my scent, as I visit the area I will use the bag hide quite regularly. I bumped into a group of Badgers last year, who quickly ran off. It was a memorable experience, but none of them were that familiar. Did you get to that stage over a long period?


    It took a few weeks, I spent many hours with them but I was not doing it for photographs although I did take a few, it got to the point were they were stuck to me like flea`s, I found them extremely playful and each had there own character, lovely things.

  • One hide will be a great start. They may already be familiar with my scent, as I visit the area I will use the bag hide quite regularly. I bumped into a group of Badgers last year, who quickly ran off. It was a memorable experience, but none of them were that familiar. Did you get to that stage over a long period?


    Quote:
    Quote:Thank you to everyone for your responses. I will try out the chair hide and consider the larger Simon King hide for future.

    My research into hides has been prompted by a recent sighting and photographing of a Red Fox. I have returned to the same spot in the hope of seeing and photographing it again, which I have managed to do so on both occasions. The second time around it saw me, stopped and ran off in the opposite direction. A green hat and camo snood doesn't really cut it! Also from the area I have been positioned there are fences, so i have to have my tripod fully extended, which doesn't help with concealment.

    The area is marshy and for the most part very open, with limited options for concealment. Once the fence is crossed, there is a burn, then you are onto farmland, I will be going to consider the best place to put the hide.

    It will be interesting to try out a portable hide for the first time.

    Thank you all.

    Steven




    I hide alone is not always enough, badgers, foxes etc can also smell you, but visit them often and once they realise that your no threat they could get quite close.

    I use to go out and sit with badgers, no hide needed, got a scare one day when a badger jumped on my lap and went eyeball to eyeball with me from about four inches Smile

  • Thank you very much for your help. I see another reason for avoiding chicken.


    Quote:I would avoid chicken just in case it gives them the taste, particularly if there are chicken keepers in your area, they do like peanuts and you don't have to put that many down so a small bag will last for a while.

    As for your question, several ways to achieve your aim, if the deer was stationary (highly unlikely) then combine two exposures, if light is good and you are able to, a circular polariser will darken the sky, finally simply enhancing the sky in post, with care a good result can be achieved. In all cases I would prefer the deer to be correctly exposed. However, if the sky is interesting and the form of the animal is clear, then a silhouette against that interesting sky would be my choice.

    HTH

  • What if I cut raw chicken into a lot of tiny, minuscule pieces? Wink What you say makes perfect sense, thank you for your clarification. I will bare that tip in mind.

    I would also appreciate your advice on a different photography matter, that has been on my mind for a while. For example, I am photographing a Roe Deer with a large background of sky. With exposure compensation set to 0, I get a nice exposure on the land and Deer, but the sky is over exposed. I may need -1.0 exposure compensation, so that the sky is correctly exposed. Would you favour a good exposure on the deer and surrounding land with no blown highlights there, with the knowledge that the sky will be overexposed?

    Thank you.


    Quote:Peanuts tend to satisfy a foxes 'sweet tooth' and cause no harm to the animals digestion, they do not digest fruit very well but peanuts will provide protein and oils to help. Also they cannot be carried away and as they are small take longer to 'hoover' up. Another good reason is that they like them Smile

    A small treat every now and then will be fine for them as payment for 'posing' nicely.


  • Quote:A possibility is using peanuts (not salted) as a means to get it to stay in one place longer whilst it gets used to the hide, you do not want to put food out that they come to expect, but peanuts are quite safe and will provide a little treat every now and then. The mistake made by many is to feed regularly, providing them with a meal, a little treat every now and then should be fine.


    Thank you for your further input, all advice is appreciated.

    Peanuts wouldn't be the first type of food that came to mind for a Fox. Why would you suggest peanuts, rather than a meat like raw chicken, which would be my first thought?

    I understand what you mean by regular feeding. As with garden birds, once you start, you need continue to do so.
  • Thank you to everyone for your responses. I will try out the chair hide and consider the larger Simon King hide for future.

    My research into hides has been prompted by a recent sighting and photographing of a Red Fox. I have returned to the same spot in the hope of seeing and photographing it again, which I have managed to do so on both occasions. The second time around it saw me, stopped and ran off in the opposite direction. A green hat and camo snood doesn't really cut it! Also from the area I have been positioned there are fences, so i have to have my tripod fully extended, which doesn't help with concealment.

    The area is marshy and for the most part very open, with limited options for concealment. Once the fence is crossed, there is a burn, then you are onto farmland, I will be going to consider the best place to put the hide.

    It will be interesting to try out a portable hide for the first time.

    Thank you all.

    Steven


  • Quote:I bought a chair hide several years back, which was quite cheap. It worked really well and remained intact through a lot of use for 2-3 yrs.
    I now use it in my darkroom for transferring films into developing tanks, which also works well.
    Only cost 60 or there abouts.
    Like this:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Camo-Pop-Up-Chair-Hide-Quick-Erect-Decoying-Shooting-Photography-Tent-Waterproof-/192192614631



    Thank you for your response, I decided to purchase the chair hide from the eBay seller you linked above. I look forward to receiving and trying it out.
  • I would appreciate any insight on this hide and any other high quality ones worth considering. I would also consider a bag hide, such as the ones sold by Wildlife Watching Supplies.

    Regards

    Steven
  • I use the Manfrotto 190 Go! aluminium version. It's a high quality tripod and I would strongly recommend it. I have a ballhead and a 3-Way Geared Head, which I regularly change over depending on my subject. The switch over is fast and easy. The legs are of a high quality and set up is easy.

    There are aluminium (1700g) and carbon fibre (1350g) versions. The carbon fibre version is around 100 more expensive, than the aluminium version.

    http://www.wexphotographic.com/manfrotto-190-go-carbon-fibre-tripod-1599491/

    There is a bewildering choice of tripod legs available. It's easy to get overwhelmed when looking at the various options, I know I was.
  • I noticed these two images side-by-side were remarkably similar!?!? Smile Is the Hare also impersonating the woman in the blue dress? He is certainly a talented fellow!

  • A Nikon Coolpix 3100 was my first digital camera. It was heavily worn, such as cosmetic wear from knocks, the command dial was partly detached from the body and the battery compartment wouldn't stay closed without an elastic band. This issue was a serious nuisance, as the band would often come loose and the camera would then switch off. It served me very well, but when I upgraded to a Nikon D50, I didn't waste much time in launching it into a bin! Smile
  • I consider myself extremely lucky/fortunate, as I have a nice home, food in the cupboards, I'm in excellent health, have a lovely woman and a great family. I live in a lovely area, ideal for a nature lover. I also live in a rich country, which I consider myself to be very fortunate to be a part of, when you consider what other countries are like. I know the U.K. has it's share of issues, but we are a very rich country, with a liberal society, When you consider what happens in some other countries, such as peaceful protesters being shot, or shot at at with assault rifles, married women who have been raped getting stoned to death for committing adultery and a lot more besides!

    I was lucky to get five numbers on the National Lottery. I have also won prizes in several competitions, including photography related items.
  • In recent times, I have been exploring black & white landscapes. I don't use the method you mention, but instead I mentally visualise the scene in b&w. I can certainly understand how a b&w preview in jpeg would be useful. I'm a beginner at the moment, but I've enjoyed it a lot and I will further explore b&w photography. It requires a different approach and thought process to colour. It's great to try something different, as it can make you think more about it. I expect you will appreciate that a subject that doesn't work in colour could be perfect for b&w and vice versa.

    I will upload some of my b&w efforts in the near future. I look forward to see any you have on your profile and future efforts.

    Have you tried Nik Silver Efex 2 Pro 2? I have read it's very capable and popular software for b&w. It's also free. I have the software, but I haven't put it use yet!


  • Quote:Whenever it's convenient I use a tripod, always have. I don't think there's any relationship between the camera settings and the use of a tripod except for longer exposures, where a tripod is essential. I leave one tripod in the trunk of the car at all times and one near the back door for backyard wildlife. I also always use a remote release when using a tripod. Having said that, the majority of my photography is wildlife, and there usually isn't time to set up, so I rely on the IS system in the camera, or some other way to steady the camera.


    I would say there is a definite relationship between camera settings and the necessity of tripod use, even when not shooting long exposures. I could set my ISO to 6400 to have a fast enough shutter speed to make hand holding realistic, whereas I could use ISO 1600, or 800 with a tripod and achieve overall better results. With my camera things start to get ugly at ISO 3200, so I'd prefer to use a tripod where practical. If I was shooting with a more advanced SLR, I could use ISO 6400 and noise wouldn't be an issue.
  • Since I upgraded to a 300mm F4 prime (non VR), I have been forced to start using a tripod a lot more. I shoot in aperture priority mode. I appreciate there are various downsides to tripod use, but there are also upsides. If I can avoid tripod use, I certainly will. If, however, I find good enough reason to use one, I will take it with me.

    I was recently photographing a Robin and and a few other bird species on a very windy day. My shutter speed was around 160/s-200/s, which would have made it a lot more difficult to get sharp shots handheld. I was glad of the tripod to lock up my camera and put my hands in my pockets, as I was struggling with the cold. Tripod use could be especially beneficial to a wildlife photographer in an extreme environment, such as Antarctica to avoid frostbite, or hypothermia. The loss of feeling makes it more difficult to press camera buttons quickly. A more extreme consequence from hand holding over long period could be the loss of a finger, or fingers.

    I think pink has covered all of the benefits above.
  • There are various companies that will clean your camera, which may require posting it. Does your camera have a sensor cleaning feature, which can help shift some, if not all of it?

    When I notice sensor dust issues that haven't shifted with the sensor cleaning feature, I firstly use the Visible Dust Hurricane Blower. When doing this, I have the camera switched off and facing downwards to let any dust fall free. I also make sure not to breathe inside the camera body and I always do this indoors. I blow air in several times. If any of the dust won't shift, I then use Visible Dust 1.5-1.6x Green Swabs, with Visible Dust Smear Away. This stuff is not cheap, but you get enough swabs for 12 cleans.

    You should be cautious when cleaning your sensor by yourself. I have not had any issues from doing the cleaning myself.