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Beachside Cafe

By WilliamRoar
Cross processing (sometimes abbreviated to X-pro) is the procedure of deliberately processing film in a chemicals intended for a different type of film. The two main methods of cross processing involve developing a slide film in C41, or colour negative film in E6. The result is an unpredictable range of colours, and is often used by Lomographers.

These images were taken on my granddad’s old Kodak Retinette IB, a 35mm viewfinder camera which was made between 1963 - 1966. The camera is in near-mint condition, so I ran a roll of out-dated (2006) Fuji Velvia 100F through it. The following images were taken between 27th December and the 28th January, before being cross-processed at a nearby photo lab. The negatives were then scanned with a Plustek 7400 at 3600dpi.

The rest of the images are on my website (link on pf), date posted: 1st February 2012

Tags: Film Process Cross X-pro Landscape and travel Xpro Analouge

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This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.

Comments


KarenFB Plus
10 4.6k 167 England
2 Feb 2012 7:37AM
An interesting image, I like the way the footsteps lead us up to the building.

I'm curious, would using out of date film make a difference to the colours, if processed 'normally'? When do you know the film is really 'past-its-best'? The closest I've been to processing my own film is walking into 'Boots', so I find the thought of using certain chemicals to produce an image fascinating! Smile

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